About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
heard fissured the university of texas at austin, the affirmative action policies in higher education. abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas at austin in 2008. fischer sued, arguing that racial minorities with worse credentials were accepted ahead of her because she was white. she contend that the schools use of of race in nations violates the u.s. constitution's guarantee of equal protection. a previous court ruling allows race to be one factor considered to achieve diversity. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> well, i get to say that this is case of love and 345, fisher of the of texas at austin. and you get to say -- >> general suter trained me too well. chief justice and members of the court, may i please the court. the essential issue here is whether the university of texas at austin and can carry its burden of proving that its use of race as an nation plus factor and the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of equal protection clause to abigail fisher met the two test of strict scrutiny, which are applicable. >> before we ge
and create jobs and helping environments. we do a tremendous amount for education and veterans. we have hired, and if you're a veteran in this room thank you very much for serving this country, we have hired 4800 veterans this year in the last 18 months or so. there is this thing called 100,000 jobs which we help starting hired 28,000 veterans and we have done 4500 ourselves. while other people are talking, we are doing. before this program we will do 1000 so we try to participate and to me it's all the same thing, healthy vibrant company, makes it all possible. the dying company, now been it is possible. i will put it in that same thing by the way, people say as an employee or shareholder if i don't make customers happy there is nothing else. if our employees don't do a good job -- it's all important to me. i try to run a fair profit, take care of your own people in your clients. let me go back to the mistake issue one more time. here's a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion in exposure in derivatives and hedging and bouncing around. you could easily tell me get it down.
are as opposed to what they are called technically. i really wish we had a catchy term for tax-exempt educational group. via things like like semi-super pac or something that would allow us to shorthanded. it would probably help a lot in the educational aspect. for readers. >> they get five o. one c. four and were out of here. editors don't want to see. >> the acronym would be excited. >> so what i see as we are entering a universe, where brad probably thinks this is positive, where more money is flying outside of party institutions, outside of candidates. more of a controlled by constellations of political operatives and donors with ties to different candidates. and that is where i see us going. i think it is a consultant strain. i mean, it is like a gold mine for political consultants. you can make so much money you don't have to answer to candidates or candidates spouses or travel anywhere. they just sit in a control room in alexandria, cut ads, collect checks, read polls. it's a great job and it is the future of politics. >> so we have a whole bunch of questions here and also people on twitte
education project at the museum. he writes and speaks extensively on religious liberty and religion in american public life. at the end of the table is dan mack, director of the aclu's program, freedom of religion and belief. he evades a wide range of religious liberty litigation, advocacy and efforts nationwide. prior to his work, he was a partner in the up says first amendment law. so what i'm going to do is try to keep this kind of a conversation. so i'll just ask a general question in each of you can answer it and respond to each other as well. with so much we want to cover. first, blistery general historical perspective. how does the state of religious freedom, but which i mean the ability of all americans to their faith compare to say 20 or 50 or 100 years ago? where are we today? maybe we could start at the end of the table and were closer to me. >> first, thanks for having us all here. we appreciate this opportunity. i've spoken to many of you many times in the past. as for the historical perspective, first i just want to say one thing about the terms religious freedom. it i
interest in paul jennings when a was director of education at james madison's month bill yeare in virginia.viinia. i was familiar with jennings' f ore considered by the white house historical association tof be the first memoir of life in the white house.nocences of jams madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his retirement review hi
her education or four for filling her dreams in her career. i want to acknowledge there and many women and many families who do continue to strive and to accomplish those things and you love children who are not planned very much and i applaud those families, but it can be a difficult circumstance and it can be a barrier for many women. and that really robs all of us have the potential that those women have to contribute amazing accomplishments and amazing ideas for public discourse that were not able to hear from them because of these types of barriers. we have seen that historically over the last two decades, i mean open wide access to contraception is something i made an incredible difference to being able to have careers, being able to hold elected office, being able to be part of our larger public discourse and the ceos and contribute to our society and that way. so it is important that we make that option available to all the women in our communities. we know that women who have trouble affording contraception are disproportionately from low income communities. this is common sen
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)